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Study: Military Should End Alt-Fuel Research

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One of the nation's largest and most influential think tank organizations believes the U.S. military is wasting time and money on alternative-fuel research.

According to a report in The New York Times, the RAND Corp. said it sees little benefit from use of alternative fuels in military vehicles, ships or weapons systems. Its study claims most technologies are too expensive or experimental to contribute significantly in the next decade.

The military, as well as environmental groups cannot disagree more strongly, calling the study flawed and shortsighted.

"This is not up to RAND's standards," Thomas Hicks, a deputy assistant Navy secretary, told The Times.

Hicks said RAND failed to take into account the national security implications of reducing oil imports. "Every barrel of oil we can replace with something that's produced domestically, the better we are as a nation, and the more secure and more independent we are."

The Navy is involved heavily in biofuels research.

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