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Rolls Royce Peels Back the Skin on the Phantom Electric

Rolls-Royce Phantom 102EX cutaway

In brief: Rolls-Royce unveiled the 102EX, a fully electric Phantom at the Geneva Motor Show, giving more details on the vehicle before it's 2011 tour begins.

Vehicle in the news

Make/Model: Phantom 102EX (formerly EE)

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce

The word

Phantom 102EX (EE) cutaway

The prototype is a one-off model that will tour the world this year as a test bed for the technology. The car features a lot of technology packed into one luxurious unit.

The aluminum space frame of the original Phantom is intact, but the legendary V12 powerhouse has been removed and replaced with a high-tech 71kWh lithium-ion battery pack and twin electric motors on an integrated differential.

The motors are rated at a whopping 145kW each equating to 800Nm (590lb-ft) of massive torque on a wide RPM band - beating its V12 by about 80Nm at it's maximum in only a small RPM range.

Those impressive power numbers are supplemented by the nickel cobalt manganese chemistry in the li-ion cells with a 230kW per kilogram density. This gives the car about 124 miles of range under a limited top speed of 99mph and a 0-60 of under 8 seconds.

That's a good punch for a luxury car like the Phantom.

The cells have been packed into modules that, when combined, resemble the shape of the original engine and gearbox (see cutaway above) to total 96 cells. These modules allow for easy replacement should there be a problem during testing.

Another interesting inclusion are the three charger units built into the Phantom 102EX. One for single-phase (120V, 20 hours to full), 3-phase (220V, 8 hours to full) and induction charging (wireless) - something new that Rolls-Royce has been working on.

Rolls plans to test battery life and tolerances under all three charging methods on the same car - something no one has done before. This will yield some interesting data on the longer-term effects of various charging methods.

And so ...

The new induction method Rolls has been developing is 90% efficient between mains and battery.

Photo credits: Rolls-Royce

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