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GM to Make Electric Motors In-House for 2013 PHEVs and EVs

Breaking News

GM Stator and Motor

In brief: General Motors is investing $246 million in refitting the Baltimore Transmission Plant to build electric motors and hybrid components for it's next-generation vehicles.

The word

GM Stator and Motor from R&D lab

The goal with the factory refitting is to have it online and producing electric motors and components by 2013 for General Motor's next-generation vehicles, most of which will be using the Voltec drive train (or variants), including the planned parallel hybrid for 2013.

Other R&D facilities in several states including Michigan, Indiana, and California will also be receiving funds to upgrade and fine-tune for this technology.

"In the future, electric motors might become as important to GM as engines are now. By designing and manufacturing electric motors in-house, we can more efficiently use energy from batteries as they evolve, potentially reducing cost and weight—two significant challenges facing batteries today." --Tom Stephens

Ultimately, GM plans to not only build, but also design and test electric motors for its own vehicles. Vice Chairman of Global Product Operations Tom Stephens says that this will facilitate not only lowered costs and improved performance, but will allow the company to customize motors to match new battery and other technology improvements as they come.

While GM has been building its electric motor and related technologies capabilities for years, this change marks the first foray into plans to manufacture them.

And so ...

Of course, GM does not plan to make all of its own motors, just the major core motors for production electrics and hybrids.

Photo credits: General Motors

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